amarchinthevines

Learning about wine, vines and vignerons whilst living in the Languedoc

2020 hindsight

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from Private Eye magazine

So, 2020. Next year has to be better, surely? There are so many negatives from the incompetence and corruption of the UK government on the big stage to the personal level with not one minute in France and spending time with my great friend Jeff, especially at vendanges. However, I am here to reflect on some of the better things.

Firstly, thank you to everyone who has connected to my blog over the course of the year, numbers have actually increased despite me posting much less. It could be that the two are connected but probably people have had more time to read.

This was the year that English (and Welsh) wines really made a big impression on me. I have had decent sparkling wines in the past, even good ones such as the single vineyard Nyetimbers. However, Davenport, Westwell, Ancre Hill and Laneberg have all proved to me during the last twelve months that great wines are being made in this country. I have liked Davenport for a number of years and they improve every year. Westwell, also in Kent, are pushing boundaries with field blend and skin contact wines amongst their portfolio and both of those are amongst my favourite wines of the year. I tasted Ancre Hill orange wine last year and was bowled over by it, it was a delight to find that their other wines are also top notch. The estate is up for sale and I hope that the buyer allows it to prosper on the path already taken. Laneberg is special because it is based in my native North East with grapes bought from further south. Elise is making very good wines and her Bacchus is a classic example of what makes English still wine so good. Please support these wineries and others, their progress is rapid and a delight.

With trips to wineries and merchants more difficult this year I have been immensely grateful to delivery companies and online merchants. I rarely buy from supermarkets or big wine companies as I prefer the wines of independent merchants and, as a student of Jeff Coutelou, of those who sell natural wines especially. French and Spanish merchants have been a big source for me, sadly the approach of Brexit makes this more difficult, and indeed, impossible for some time. However, there are many excellent independent merchants in this country who put their hearts into the wines they sell and, again, I urge UK readers to support them. I have listed some examples at the bottom of the page*. Meanwhile my thanks to them and the drivers.

I have written a lot over the years about Jeff championing traditional and rare grape varieties. As I write I am enjoying a glass of Couleurs Réunies, a blend of more than a dozen grapes, some of which even surprised the French treasury of grapes. Surprisingly, therefore it has been a year of traditional grapes for me. Riesling has featured heavily, in its many forms I adore the grape. Aligoté is another to have made a huge impression. A grape which was scorned for most of my life even in Burgundy, regarded only as an ingredient for a kir. I have enjoyed some fine examples this year, citrussy and fresh for some and round and creamy from others.

The other mainstay of the year has been sherry. I adore sherry, again often maligned. From fresh, cleansing Fino to nutty Amontillado to luscious Oloroso and Pedro Ximenex, sherry is a world of flavours. The sherry makers are rediscovering traditional methods and using techniques to get away from the damaging reputation of sweet cream sherry favoured by elderly ladies and vicars. Sherries which don’t involve fortification like Cota 45 (one of my wines of the year last year), others which have reduced filtration and fining (en rama) – the range of great wines is amazing and, no apologies, deserves your support.

Other quick mentions. Little Wine have raised the bar with their online coverage of the natural scene and have a great sales section too. Jamie Goode and David Crossley continue to provide must read material online. I thoroughly and belatedly enjoyed Max Allen’s book on the up and coming producers of Australia. I was unsettled, whilst still enthralled, by Jane Lopes’ book, honestly like no other I have read.

So, what about actual wines? Well, that’s for next time.

*

Caves De Pyrene

Little Wine

Joseph Barnes

Grape Britannia

Buon Vino

Vintage Roots

Whisky Exchange

Author: amarch34

I'm a recently retired (early!) teacher from County Durham in North east England. I am going to be spending most of the next year in the Languedoc leaarning about wines, vineyards and the people who care for both.

One thought on “2020 hindsight

  1. Having just written my own review of the year it’s so nice to read another and find so many similar pleasures, definitely including Ancre Hill and Westwell. Though annoyingly in my own article I forgot to mention Black Chalk, currently my favourite ESW, some of which is ready to head my way in January, having emptied my reserves. But I cannot wait for Part 2. Especially as I’m off now for the “festive” season with more time.

    Have a good one, Alan. Maybe see you at Raw 2021, if it’s allowed.

    Like

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