amarchinthevines

Learning about wine, vines and vignerons whilst living in the Languedoc

The Winery by Laneberg Wine

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2020 has been horrendous for everyone in many ways and, though not important on a wider scale, one of those ways for me was not being able to get to spend time in the vines and cellars of Jeff Coutelou. Little did I know that by an indirect route I would end up amongst barrels and tanks which had contained Coutelou grapes. In my native North East England, specifically on Team Valley, Gateshead – a most unlikely turn of events.

Elise and Liam

Elise Lane set up The Winery and Laneberg Wines on Team Valley when she returned to the North East with her family. She studied Chemistry at Oxford University before working in the world of finance in London. She told me that she became interested in wine at University and, unsurprisingly, it was her curiosity about the chemistry of wine which was the catalyst for further study. WSET qualifications followed but then Elise enrolled at Plumpton College to earn a Post Graduate Diploma, working in the winery there.

Plumpton graduates have gone on to become winemakers around the world, some in my region of Languedoc Roussillon such as Peter Core and Jonathan Hesford. Elise and her husband Nick looked at vineyards in Kent but then decided to relocate to the North East and set up an urban winery. All this whilst pregnant with her second son. Team Valley, a large business and industrial estate in Gateshead became the location for The Winery by Laneberg Wines.

Elise bought equipment from London Cru, the original English urban winery. There lies my connection as London Cru bought Cabernet Sauvignon grapes from Jeff, I helped to pick them! The wine they made was often considered their best wine by critics such as Jamie Goode. So, when Elise showed me the basket press and barrels she had purchased from that winery I had to smile at the small world we live in.

Elise told me that there are around 400 vineyards in the UK but only a quarter of so actually make their own wines. Therefore, grapes can be bought readily enough and, in her first year of production in 2018 she sourced them from Leicestershire and Gloucestershire. Since then the Lane family have used their campervan to tour other vineyards in southern England and, with two years’ experience, Elise has kept some of her original suppliers and selected new ones.

The grapes are transported by lorry overnight to Gateshead, ready for sorting in the morning. They are placed in stainless steel tanks for fermentation and then Elise makes decisions about nurturing the wines, eg in barrels, judging what will serve them best. The barrels are used to impart a smoky influence rather than overt oakiness.

Bacchus 2018 and 2019, note the change in label showing the fruits redolent in the wine in a style based on Bacchus’ hair

Bacchus is the main white grape for Laneberg, reflecting the national picture. In my opinion it is the grape which brings a unique character to English white wine. The 2018 Laneberg Bacchus is now sold out having immediately created a big impression. So much so that Fortnum and Mason have asked Elise to provide their House English wine. A tremendous vote of confidence in Elise’s talents. I thoroughly enjoyed the 2019 Bacchus, my wine loving brother in law who was there when I opened a bottle said he would definitely buy this wine. Floral, fruity aromas with a zingy, citrus flavour, the wine was as good the second day as the first and its fresh acidity is a good food match. I had a Singapore curry dish with the Bacchus and the wine stood up to the flavours and enhanced them, it was a great match. Give me this over most Sauvignon Blancs or Albarinos. No wonder the Bacchus has brought plaudits.

Technical detail about the 2019 Bacchus from The Winery website

Harvest time means that the family get together to support Elise and work to sort and crush the grapes. Her cousin Liam is a full-time employee immersing himself in the wine world. Team Valley teamwork. Lots of farmers’ markets, stalls and marketing followed the first winemaking, drumming up interest and sales. Now the word is out. Excellent reviews from respected critics such as the great Oz Clarke have helped; mentions and articles in Decanter, local and national press and television have followed. Laneberg had earned the Regional Award for The Midlands and North in The Wine GB Awards the night before I made my visit.

Elise has a wise business plan, her time in finance and accounting no doubt helping. I have met a number of young winemakers who have found the business and sales side an unwelcome reality check. Elise and Nick had a plan and stuck to it, the success that has followed is well deserved. Elise knows that she has to make wines that will appeal to the customer and give her financial security. Initially ten thousand bottles were made, that will rise to around thirteen thousand with the 2020 harvest.

So, what about the other wines? It’s worth mentioning that there are excellent notes about each wine on the Laneberg website with tasting notes by outside tasters as well as technical information for each wine. The labels, by a North East designer, back these up by showing the sort of fruits which may be in the bottle based on the original picture of the god of wine, Bacchus, with the fruit replacing his hair.

‘This Mortal Angel’ (Geordie references abound) is a semi sparkling wine made from 100% Seyval Blanc, a hybrid grape which ripens early and is suited to cool climates. The wine was enjoyed on a hot, September North East England afternoon and provided welcome refreshment. It is very dry, as all the Laneberg wines are. There was a gripping acidity, I think this wine will age well, accompanying dishes such as seafood. There were apple and pear flavours which revealed themselves as the bottle emptied. Only 10% alcohol, so this really was a good afternoon aperitif wine.

Pinot Gris 2018 was less convincing for me. It is very dry again, citrussy and probably needs longer in bottle. Don’t expect Pinot Grigio style wine, this variety is on the margins in England and the full aromatic, ripe style is not what this wine is about. Pleasant but not the character of the Bacchus.

Elise made other wines in 2018, now unavailable, Solaris, a white grape developed in Germany in 1975 was one. Madeleine Angevin, a white grape, was also bought and blended with red Regent grapes to make a rosé by crushing them together so that the white juice had contact with red grape skins. Hopefully I will find some of the next vintage.

Finally, the Regent grape was used to make the first red at the winery in 2019. Named after her son Maximilian this was a wine which I found intriguing. Regent was created by crossing a white vitis vinifera grape, Diana, with a red hybrid, Chambourcin. It grows well in cooler climates and is resistant to downy mildew, an important attribute in such regions. The label shows blackberries and raspberries and it was the latter which dominated on my palate. However, its first wow factor is the vibrant purple colour, striking. Aromas of cherry and raspberry, flavours of sharp raspberry with a cleaning acidity. The wine was better on the second day, softening the acidity a little, I will definitely put my second bottle away for a year or two. More plummy fruit emerged on that second day though raspberry still dominated for me. Again, a food wine. I’d buy more.

I was curious about an urban winery in my home region, would it work, was it a serious venture? I should have had no doubts. Elise’s background in science and finance have given her the tools to make a success of The Winery. Her talents as a winemaker are evident in the bottles and the warm reception they have received. Laneberg Wines is a name to add to your list of regular purchases.

Author: amarch34

I'm a recently retired (early!) teacher from County Durham in North east England. I am going to be spending most of the next year in the Languedoc leaarning about wines, vineyards and the people who care for both.

3 thoughts on “The Winery by Laneberg Wine

  1. I was waiting for this article and wasn’t disappointed. But you’ve really made me want to taste these wines now.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. What an exciting story, Alan. Bravo to Elise and Nick and Liam! Bacchus has become a terrific grape for the English wine canon (if I can use that word!). Ages ago, being a Devonian, I tried Sharpham’s and didn’t much care for it, but tried again more recently, and, boy! they’d got it right. Succulent and more-ish. Facile a boire.
    Gateshead is lucky to have you guys! Fill your car boots!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. What a fascinating venture!

    Liked by 1 person

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